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COLLEGE 






7N EW3 



Vol. 3. No. 31. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1, 1904. 



Price, 5 Cents 



Inter-Club Debate. 

Ever since their organization in the fall, 
the Senior-Sophomore and the Junior- 
Freshman divisions of the Debating Club 
have been holding bi-weekly meetings, 
and working toward the inter-club debate, 
which was held in College Hall chapel, May 
,^o. ii)04, at three o'clock in the afternoon, 
with Mr. Macdougall as chairman. A 
good sized audience was present and 
e \ inced a lively interest in the debate from 
beginning to end. The question for dis- 
cussion was. Resolved: That railway 
pooling should be permitted in the United 
.States, The Senior-Sophomore division 
held the affirmative, with Catherine Jones, 
iqo6, Bonnie Abbott, 1906. and Marian 
Kinney. 190-1., as speakers, named in order 
of their speeches and rebuttals. The order 
of main speeches on the negative was 
Blanche Wenner, 1905, Lucy Curtis, 1905, 
and Florence Plummer, 1907. In rebuttals 
Miss Curtis spoke first, then Miss Plummer 
and Miss Wenner. The judges, Mr. Gross- 
man and Mr. Foster of Harvard, and Miss 
Perry, gave their decision in favor of the 
negative; a decision which, in spite of the 
good work done on both sides was perhaps 
supported by most of the audience. The 
work of the negative was very carefully 
organized throughout and was made telling 
by clever refutation and rebuttal. Miss 
Wenner announced in her first speech that 
the affirmative would do either one of two 
things, either sttggest practical methods 
for bettering existing conditions or show 
how pooling can be regulated under exist- 
ing laws; and in her rebuttal she main- 
tained that the affirmative in failing to 
show how pooling could be regulated 
and conditions bettered had only failed 
where experts have not succeeded. The 
affirmative brought up the argument 
that pooling has been successful in the 
past, and maintained that the present 
bad conditions would be bettered if pooling 
were now permitted. They said that 
natural , checks would prevent discrimina- 
tions and rate wars, a position which the 
negative objected to. On both sides evi- 
dence was shown of carefttl work in prepara- 
tion, and we have great need to be proud 



of both teams, not only of the girls who 
actually debated, but of the girls on the 
working team and of the chairmen of the 
debating clubs. The girls have shown 
that we can have a debating team who can 
not only furnish good arguments but can 
also present those arguments in excellent 
form and hold their own in rebuttal. Es- 
pecially good work in rebuttal was done by 
Miss Wenner, Miss Abbott and Miss Plum- 
mer. 

While the judges were out, the audience 
relieved their suspense by singing college 
songs, and when the result was announced, 
enthusiastic cheering for debaters and 
judges resounded through the chapel and 
College Hall Center. Altogether the pros- 
pects for our debates next year are most 
encouraging. 

Silver Bay an Opportunity. 

The growth of student organizations has 
put into the hands of some girls special 
power. To accept office in these organiza- 
tions means to assume a grave responsibili- 
ty for some of the large interests of the col- 
lege life. No new officer is a person of 
experience, and there is no girl who is 
worthy of such a position but feels the need 
of as much wisdom as she can get from the 
experience of others. No one expects to 
undertake the work without deliberation 
and careful planning. Has the value of 
the Silver Ba}r gathering as a "conference " 
emphasized itself enough to these girls? 
It is a place for "conferring" together on 
vital college interests. In the rush of the 
end of the year there is no leisure for plan- 
ning new work, nor in the rush of the be- 
ginning of the year. But here in restful 
surroundings there is leisure. Each can 
plan for her own work and view it in its 
relation to all the wide interests of college 
life. There is helpful contact with leaders 
in other colleges. There is close connec- 
tion with other leaders in our own college. 

The Student Government and the Chris- 
tian Association are the most inclusive of | 
all stttdent organizations and the most in- 
fluential. Before the first is set the great 
task of making all the relations of student 
life approach the ideal, and before the 



second the equivalent task of making the 
spirit of Christ prevail in all college re- 
lations. Who is sufficient for these things? 
Not the officers alone. Every member 
has her own responsibility. This sum- 
mer's conference might help you to meet 
yours. Persuade your best friend to go 
with you. You will enjoy her more than 
you could in any other place where you 
might visit together, and you and she may 
find friends whom you would never have 
discovered at college, just the people to 
lay hold upon and use to help you in carry- 
ing out some work for the college which 
you have at heart. 

Ten days out of the precious summer 
time are much to give. Are they too much 
if there is real help and inspiration to be 
had? "Public office is a public trust." 
Do not responsible leaders owe as much as 
this to those who have elected them from 
among all the students to fulfil important 
trusts ? 

If it is not wholly clear what is to be 
gained at Silver Bay remember that there 
is a meeting to be held on Sunday after- 
noon, June the fifth, by Longfellow Pond, 
to explain more about it. All who have 
any interest in the matter will be cordially 
welcome. E. H. Kendrick. 

Suggestive Summer Days. 

One of the girls from another college, 
who was at Silver Bay last summer, in 
speaking of the conference said that as she 
sat there near the beautiful shores of Lake 
George, a parallel picture of the disciples 
sitting at the feet of Jesus on the shores of 
Galilee constantly recurred to her mind. 
Just as they had come to" be taught of Je- 
sus, so were we gathered together to learn 
the lessons which have come down through 
all the intervening years with the same 
truth and power as in the olden time. We 
were taught, as were the disciples of old, 
the value of the right life for ourselves, and 
the necessity of bringing the light, which 
has shone for us into the lives of others. 
We were told of the work to be done in 
college, at home and in the world at large, 
and of methods for successfully accom- 
plishing it. Few of us who were at Silver 
Bay last year will soon forget Mr. Hicks' 
address on the "Choice of Our Life Work. " 
He placed it so clearly before us, how, with 
a sober estimate of our ability, and a clear 
vision of the field before us, we must 
thoughtfully and prayerfully choose for 
ourselves that work in which we can use the 
talents God has given us to the best advan- 
tage. This problem is one which we all 
must soon face, and the Silver Bay Con- 
ference furnishes us a splendid opportunity 
for considering it. A. O. S., 1905. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College IRews, 



Press of N. A Lir 



scy & Co., Boston. 



Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents 
a jeur to resilient subscribers; $1.00 per year to 
non-resiilent subscribers. 

All advertising communications should be sent 
to Miss C. W. Rogers. Wellesley Inn, Wellesley. 

All business correspondence should be ail 
dressed to ANNIE V. LUFF, Business Manager 
College News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Cora L. 
Butler. 



Editor-in-Chief, Mary Jessie Gidley, 1906 

Associate Editor, Sadie M. Samuel, 1906 

Literary Editors, 

Winifred Hawluidge, 1906 Mary Lee Cadwell, 1906 

Alumna Editor, Roxana H. Vivian, 1894 

Managing Editors, 

Annie V. Luff, 1904 

Cora L. Butler, 1904 Edith Fox, 1904 



"Entered as second class matter November 12. 
1903, nt the post office at Wellesley, Mass., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3. 1879. 



There is an especially popular proverb 
to the effect that a genius may be an illegi- 
ble writer, but while the errors of many 
pitiable scrawls of mediocrity may be laid 
upon this same adage, there is extant no 
like morsel of indiscriminate flattery which 
can account for the deplorable spelling 
prevalent in our institutions of higher 
learning. The high art of orthography 
has certainly advanced to the impression- 
istic stage, and the canons of Noah Webster 
seem known only that the)' may be disre- 
garded. Our mothers and grandmothers 
were familiar with the laws of the spelling- 
book, but it was not the familiarity which 
breeds contempt. But the airy flippancy 
of our attitude toward so insignificant a 
thing as a rudiment of education has un- 
doubtedly done much for the spread of 
amateur phonetics; and bad spellers have 
come to view their mistakes as a mark 
more of distinction than of notoriety. We 
are capable of understanding philosophy 
even with two l's, and of appreciating Car- 
lyle while we spell him Carlisle, therefore 
we are not afraid of being underrated. 
Yet those who know the most about Car- 
lyle and philosophy seem always to spell 
them correctly. In fact, it is rather un- 
usual to find a person possessed of ex- 
ceptional ability to do the more compli- 
cated things who is willing to mis-spell a 
word. We may have poor -memories, or 





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Sterling Silver. 

Hat Pins (size of cut, 

$1.00 

Stick Pins (smaller), .50 

Sent postpaid on re- 
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sale at our store. 

41 Summer Street, 
Next door, Hovey's 
Boston. 
Wholesale and Retail. 



SPECTACLES 

and EYEGLASSES. 



In our enlarged quarters we are better pre- 
pared than ever to lurnish you with the very 
best Optical Goods, at our usual moderate 
prices. We solicit a comparison of our goods 
and prices. 

Pinkham <Sr Smith, 

The Back Bay Opticians, 
288 Boylston Street, Boston. 



we may by nature be unable to spell, but 
there is no reason why we should not know 
how to use an English dictionary as well as 
a Poole's Index. Character is shown in 
many ways, and perhaps accuracy of de- 
tail is as commendable in the rudiments as 
in the accessories of education. 

Perhaps it is because women's minds are 
so much occupied with small things that 
in a woman's college we find a somewhat 
strained emphasis placed upon thinps 
which are relatively unimportant. This 
emphasis develops into a pose, after it has 
been adopted, as it usually is, by a suffi- 
cient number of students. It is not that 
men's colleges are free from such fads, 
nor that women's colleges are overrun 
with them, but the things which we seek 
are characterized by a minuteness of at- 
tention quite out of proportion to their 
intrinsic value. We are pleased by the 
"subtle" things, and consequently we 
strain after subtlety until the perfectly 
obvious quite escapes our notice. We 
admire originality, therefore so many adopt 
the original, that the only unconventional 
girl is the exception who adopts nothing' 
at all. Our sense of humor is delicate and 
academic, but we forget to laugh at our- 
selves. At class meetings and Student 
Government meetings we quarrel and 
quibble over a word all afternoon, and 
drag one after another into our mesh of 
discussion until there is hardly one left who 
can see the tight of things. If we could 
onlv adopt the straight-out- from-thc shoul- 
der pose for a few months, the effect would 
possibly be a trifle brutal and probab'y a 
bit overdone, but it certainly would lea 
relief. 



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SPECIAL RATES TO WELLESLEY STUDENTS 



Wellesley Steam Laundry, 

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COLL K G E N E W S 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



fune -■, 7.30 I'M , mid week prayer meeting of the Christian 
\ ociation, Address by President Woolley of Ml Holyoke 
College 

J une 3, Tree I >aj 

[ une 1. , |o to 9 30, P.M., Tan Zeta Epsilon Platform Dance. 

[une 5, 11 A.M., services in Houghton Memorial Chapel. Ser- 
mon by Rev. ArtemasJ. Haynes ol New Haven, Connecti- 
cut. Communion sen ice, 
7 I'M .vespers Special organ music. 

fune 6, 3 to 6.00 P.M., at the Zola Alpha House, roli II ion 

7,^0 to 9.30 P M., at Tupelo, Phi Sigma Promenade Con- 
cert. 
June 8, «) A.M., examinations begin. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 



Miss Leggitt, Miss Hazard's cousin, who is visiting the 
College, read a very interesting paper on Japan, Wednesday 
evening, May 25, in Stone Hall Parlor. She spoke particularly 
of the strange customs of the Japanese. 

Thursday afternoon, May 26, at the Shakespeare House, Colo- 
mi Thomas Wentworth Higginson gave an informal talk on his 
personal recollections of famous poets. He told some very inter- 
esting anecdotes about Holmes, Lowell, Whittier and Longfel- 
low. Miss Berwick, who accompanied Colonel Higginson, gave 
one or two recitations which were received with great favor by 
the audience. 

The Christian Association prayer meeting, Thursday evening, 
May 26, was led by Miss Florence Hutsinpillar. The subject of 
the meeting was, " The Existence of God.' ' 

Friday afternoon. May 27, instead of the regular meeting of the 
English 1 5 class, a mock trial was held. The form as far as pos- 
sible was taken from the court room. Before a judge and jury, 
the lawyers for the prosecution and defence carried on an exam- 
ination of various witnesses, and then each side made a plea be_ 
fore the jury. Miss Dowd was judge; Miss Camp, clerk of court; 
Miss Tones, crier; Miss Collier, sargeant-at-arms ; Misses Halsey 
and Tufts were prosecuting attorneys; Misses Batty and Mac 
Lellan defended the prisoner. Miss Daniels. The verdict ren- 
dered was "not guilty." 

The Philadelphia Club was entertained by the Misses Button 
Conway, Doak, Lape, McQueen and Scott, Friday evening, May 
27, at Stone Hall. 

Mr. Stuart, superintendent of the New Britain schools, father 
of Miss Teresa C. Stuart, 1907, visited Wellesley last week. 

Just inside the gateway by the East Lodge, and between the 
path through the orchard and Washington street, the founda- 
tions of Bullard's Tavern are being excavated. Here on the 
iSth of April, 1775, the Wellesley Minute Men met and started 
for Concord. The original stones of the tavern foundation are 
to be kept and the place marked by a memorial of some kind. 
Mrs. Durant is to appoint a day soon for a formal celebration. 
All Wellesley girls may not know that the high hill was once 
called Bullard's Hill and Lake Waban Bullard's Pond, and that 
on our own campus is the most historic spot in the town of 
Wellesley. 



NEW STYLES IN 

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Neckwear, Gloves. 

Neckwear, = = 50c to $5.00 

Newest Stocks, Latest Sbapes. 
QloveS For Street, Dress and Driving $1.50 to 3.00 

FOWNES' Famous Hand Sewn, 1.50 



NOYES BROS. 

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The Walnut Hill School for Girls, 

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Tuition and Board, $600.00 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



Miss Conant and Miss Bigelow, Principals. 



L. P. HOLLANDER & CO. 

Young Ladies' Gowns, Coats and Wraps, 

Millinery, Hats, Underwear and Gloves 

NEW SPRUNG DESIGNS Now Ready. 

We call special attention to a large assortment of DRESSES MADE IN OUR OWN WORKROOMS for School 
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C O I. I. K C, V. N K W S 



The Plimpton Collection of Italian Books. | CnT'T/^ , I^"NJp\7 ^sl\/[TT']-F 



The valuable collection of Italian books presented to the Co 
lege by Mr. George A Plimpton of New York, in memory of his 
wife, Frances Taylor Pearsons Plimpton of the class of '84, 
reached us recently. It is designed to illustrate the develop- 
ment of Italian literature and is especially rich in the works of 
authors of the sixteenth century, the golden age of the Italian 
Renaissance. Among its treasures are illuminated manuscripts, 
incunabula, first and early editions, in which appear the works of 
Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Villani. Lorenzo the Magnificent. 
Savanarola, Macchiavelli, Boiardo, Ariosto, Tasso, Galileo and 
many others. 

Mr. Theodore Koch closes a long article on the collection in 
"Library of Congress," by saying, "With the interest in things 
Italian growing thus rapidly in this country. Wellesley College 
is to be congratulated on the fact that the Plimpton Collection is 
destined to its care. The books will not only help out the re- 
sources enjoyed by students of Italian literature and history in 
and around Boston, but will serve to illustrate many points in the 
early historv of printing, will show a few examples of Renais- 
sance illumination, and might well serve for the basis of special 
study of the Italian romances of chivalry. " 

We are indeed proud to be the custodians of this rare memorial 
to one of Wellesley's daughters. t 

It will be announced in a later issue of the News when they will 
be on view. 

AR T NO TES. 

The Art Department is most fortunate in having recently re- 
ceived from Miss Hannah Parker Kimball of Boston the gift of a 
copy of Bernhard Berenson's book, " Drawings of the Florentine 
Painters." Onlv a few copies of this valuable collection of re- 
productions have been printed : and the College is therefore par- 
ticularly favored in having in its possession a book whose worth 
can not' fail to be recognized by art students as well as by author- 
ities on art subjects. 

Mr. Bercnson, whose visit to the College will be pleasantly 
remembered by-many, is already inseparably associated with art 
history and criticism; and the years of painstaking study and 
research he has expended in collecting his material for this mas- 
terpiece warrant us in accepting it as a reliable as well as ex- 
tremely interesting and attractive work. The book includes 
besides two volumes of text, one hundred and eighty plates re- 
producing in facsimile the size, coloring and method of the 
original drawings and studies of the Florentine masters and 
minor artists. Michaelangelo, Andrea del Sarto, Leonardo. 
Botticelli are well represented, while many plates are devoted to 
the work of their contemporaries and followers. Through the 
generosity of Miss Kimball, these plates have been separately 
mounted, which makes them more accessible for general use. 

It will be remembered that Miss Kimball was the donor of 
$2,000 last year, to be spent for originals for the Art Collection, 
and that the interesting antique head now in the Art Gallery was 
her gift to the College the previous year. 

Out-of-door Life at Silver Bay. 

Part at least of the joy of a few days at Silver Bay is contrib- 
uted by the outdoor life of the place. I am not referring to the 
whole of the time spent in the free mountain air, but only to 
the more active hours of it, the long walks and the boat rices. 

Then at the end of the Conference come two days of great in- 
terest to all the preparatory schools and colleges — Field Day and 
College Day. College Da'y is more like our own Tree Day than 
anything else I have ever known. The various college repre- 
sentatives clad in light gowns trimmed with their college colors, 
gather in a procession which marches around by the Hotels. 
The Vassar girls, with their gray and pink banners, the Smith girls 
with their yellow and white, all fill us with enthusiasm; but 
when the Wellesley girls are called upon, then our own college 
spirit rises proudly, as we join in singing our own musical cheer. 

M. H. T., 1005. 

IN O T B ! 

Wellesley Students will find 

Wright <Sr Ditson's Store, 

344 Washington Street, Boston, 

An ideal place to purchase Athletic Supplies. They have the best 
and latest goods for each pastime: FIELD HOCKEY, TENNIS, 
GOLF, BASKET BALL, FENCING. SKATES, SKATING and 
GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

Wright & Ditson are getting out. a catalogue exclusively for ladies, 
which will be sent free to any address. 



157 Tremont Street, Boston, 

Allow 10 per cent, discount to 
Teachers and Pupils of Welles- 
ley College on 

Ladies' Costumes, 
Street, Walking Suits, 
Skirts and Garments 

of All Kinds, 

Waists and Furs, 

(OUR ONLY STORE.) 



Intercollegiate Bureau of Academic Costume 

Chartered 190'i. 
COTRELL & LEONARD, Albany, N. Y. 

Makers of the Caps, Gowns and 

Hoods to the American Colleges 

and Universities. 

Illustrated Bulletins, Samples, Blanks, etc., on application 

Annie W. Stocking, (Wellesley '02) in charge of 
correspondence, may be addressed as above 



WELLESLEY AND OTHER HOODS. 

15. A., $3.50 to S 8.50; desirable, $ 5.50 

M. A., .... 0.75 " 16.50; " 10.50 

Ph. D., . 8.50 " -2-J.nO; " 13.50 

DDECUBBfln OTAPIf mocha and java coffee, 

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The Highest Grade Coffee. 

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STORTEV/RNT & HflLiEY, 

Beef arid Supply Co., 

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Tel. 933 Riehmond. BOSTON. 




J. SCARPATO, 

Fruit and Confectionery, 

ao Central Street, 
WELLESLEY, - MASS. 

The Attention 

that we give to details is the secret 
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a trial package from you? 

People's Steam Laundry, 

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COL I. E G E N !•: w s 



FREE PRESS. 

i 

In so large a c munitj .1 i this • oil < ours, where so manj 

girls arc gathered togcthei [rom all parts oi thi country, the 

necessity for strict chaperon laws is 1 videnl to require dii 

cussion. Personally, the writer iih.si heartily approves of the 
rules which the Studenl Governmeni \ 01 iation has passed cm 
this subject, btil she as heartily wishes thai there might be some 
mi thod of making h nol quite so dilricull to obey these rules. 
To attend anj evening entertainment outside of Wellesley, one 
must make one of a part) ol not more than five under an ap- 
proved chaperon. Well and good but please furnish the 
chaperon ! 

Recently . to the 1 ertain km m li dge of the writer, a college girl 
asked seventeen members oi the Faculty in turn, to act as 
chaperon to a Symphony party, 1 efore she was able to secure 
one. The names of all those whom she asked were on the ap- 
proved list, and thej ma) therefore be supposed to have sig- 
nified their willingness to ad as chaperons when requested. On 
another occasion, also recently, a party of four students was 
obliged to remain away from a very fine concert given in Bos- 
ton, because, alter an all-day's search, no chaperon could be 
found. These are but two examples of the many which might 
be cited, of the difficulty involved in securing a chaperon. 
And does it seen quite fair that girls who wish to enjoy a lecture 
or concert in Boston should be obliged to waste so much time 
and energy in a frequently vain attempt to obey so obviously 
sane a law ? 

The writer must not be understood to insist that members 
of the Faculty should be forced, willy-nilly, to act as chaper- 
ons, but she does respectfully suggest that some method be 
employed of providing suitable chaperons who have both time 
and inclination to fulfill this kindly office when occasion demands. 



II 



M. W. 



The pilea for new btilletin boards is one that will doubtless 
be seconded by many who have found the present system 
inadequate; yet there is something to be said on the other side 
of the question. Some of us who have made morning trips 
from one end of the building to the other and up and down 
stairs in search of notices for which we must be held responsible, 
are not especially enthusiastic over the plan of adding another 
bulletin board to the present number. Moreover, the writer in 
the last number of College News speaks of the "added expense 
of mail" to the various organizations as strengthening their 
claim to a new index bulletin. On investigation, it seems that, 
as a matter of fact, it costs nothing to send mail through the 
boxes in Room 7 to the Eliot, the Fiske, or the Noanett. This, 
then, reduces the number of houses to eight. Packages 
of mail may now be sent to the students living in any 
one dormitory for two-thirds of a cent. Supposing that 
such packages must be sent as often as once in two weeks, the 
greatest expense for sending to all the houses would then be two 
and two- thirds cents a week, an amount which the organizations 
need hardly consider worth their attention under ordinary 
circumstances. 1906. 

r the Land of the Mid = 
night Lunch, 

ing can equal 

UndM wood's Oiiginal Deviled Ham 

Made from sugar-cured 
ham and fine, pure 
spices. Delicious 
for sandwiches, at 
lunch, picnic, or tea, 
and in the chafing 
dish. 

It may be bought at 
any good groceis, 
but be sure you see 
on the can THE 
LITTLE RED 
DEVIL. 

Our hook contain* a lot of unique and practical receipts. We will 
send it free. VVM. UNDERWOOD & CO., Boston, Mass., TJ. S, A. 




G F. tiovcy & Co. 

Stationery i Engraving 



Estimates given on Engraving 
and Printing for Class Day 
Invitations, Etc. ... 



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"A Railroad Idyl" 

Is the title of a 9 in. x 12 in. brochure is- 
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Copies of this pamphlet may he secured 
by those interested by enclosing stamp to 
A. S. Hanson, Gen. Pass. Agent, Boston, 
Mass. 



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C L LEGE NEWS 



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SO and 60c per lb 



DELICIOUS -DAINTY PURE 
416 Washington St., ( 4th door North of Summer St. 



AGENT FOB 

Lcwando's Dye House, 
Mrs. H. E. Currier's, 

Grove Street, Wellesley. 

Dr. Henry's Dental Office 

will be removed from Shat- 
tuck's Building to the New 
Block (Taylor's), in Welles- 
ley Square, about May 1, '04. 

SMITH BROTHERS, 

Butter, Cheese & Eggs, 

2 and 4 New Faneuil Hall 

Market, 

BOSTON, MASS. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Cream- 
ery. 

MARY L. MORAN, 
Dressmaking, 

Shaw Building, Wellesley, Mass. 
latest pasl?ior)5, 

GEO. P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costume Parlors, 

2 Boylston Place, Boston 

Costumes tor private theatricals 
and Costume parties. 

John A. Morgan St Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wel'esley Mass. 

"Tom" Griffin, lin ^ e n l1 s e t s l ey 

Carriages at Station on arrival of all trams. 

Reliable Horses and Carriages To Let. 

Personal Attention to all orders 
lor evening trains. Order box at 
North Door of College Hall. 

BAGGAGE THANSFEHJRKD. 

TELEPHONE 101-6. 

James Korntved, 



Shaw Block, Room i, 
wellesley square. 

Special attention paid to pressing 
and cleaning. 

H. L. FLAGG, 

Daily Papers, Periodicals, Sta- 
tionery, Etc. 

Wright & Ditsou's Sporting Goods 
wab«n Block. Wellesley So. 



THE PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



A FAREWELL ODE. 
My little room, my college room, 

My six by eight, adieu, 
Rare June is come and I must go. 

When my exams are through. 

Within these walls my Freshie tears. 

Those briniest were shed; 
Entombed in flunk notes, gone to waste. 

How many a hope lies dead! 

My faithful, long-chafed chafing-dish. 

Burnt offerings served me well, 
My flask for alcohol, how oft 

Your spirits rose and fell, 

A broken chip, a splinter here, 

A leg 'neath table find. 
Alas! a ruined chair, the crush 

Of room-mate's weighty mind. 

Farewell, farewell, my downy couch! 

The only down you've seen 
Was when you fell 'neath fifteen girls, 

Yet rose again I ween. 

For every pin-mark on the wall. 

Repentant conscience pricks, 
And every loosened board has creaked, 

'Neath our " Nach Zehn TJhr" tricks. 

But ah, the darkness hides the dust, 

'Tis chill, 'tis growing late, 
Farewell, farewell my college room, 

Be good to nineteen-eight. 

J. M. N. 

LIMERICKS. 
There was a distinguished Duranter 
Who wore a bright red tam o' shanter, 
When asked, "Is this wise?" 
She said, with surprise, 
"I never could tolerate banter." 

There was a sweet maid from Stone Hall 
Who was caught on the lake in a squall, 

So she let go each oar 

And swam for the shore. 
Saying, "This is no trouble at all!" 



ADOLPH E. LEWIS, 

Ladies' Tailor and Habit Maker, 

Riding Habits for Cross and Side Saddle a Specialty. 

231 Washington Street, 
Harvard Square. BROOKLINE, MASS. 

TELEPHONE 268-2 BKOOKLTNE. 

Near Clasen Riding School. 



WELLESLEY 
DISCOUNT AT 



Butterfield's Bookshop 



59 BROMFIELD 
ST., BOSTON 



Tel. Main 3712 BASEMENT of Paddock Buildini 



The slock is one that has been carefully selected by Mr. Bntterfield, 
and represents all that is best in recent literature, and among the stock are 
many rare old volumes that will appeal to booklovers The location is 
convenient, and the quiet, cheerful tone of the shop lends a charm to the 
pleasure of book buying. -Boston Courier. Send tor Book List. 



R. rl. PORTER, 

The Wellesley Plumber, 

Dealer in Hardware. Tin Ware, 
Window Screens, Brass Rods and 
Fixtures; Paints, Oils and Var- 
nishes. 

Taylor's Block. 

Established 1875. 

Chas. E. Shattuck, 
GROCER. 

WelUsley .Square. 

Qassius HV JHall, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

B. S. COLE, 

Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Poultry 

and Game, 

Wholesale and Retail. 

Stalls 1 3 & 1 5 Faneuil Hall Market 

Tel. Connection. BOSTON 

F. A. Coolidge &Co., 

Dealers in 

Choice Meats & Provisions 

Washington St., Wellesley. 



J. TAILBY & SON, 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station 

Orders by mall or otherwis« 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 No. Ave., Natick, 
HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Telephone. 



New England. Calcium Light fo, 

Manufacturers of Oxygen and Hydrogen 
Gas for Illuminations and Stereopticons 

CALCIUM LIGHTS, 
with Beautiful Colored Effects for Thea- 
tres, Tableaux, Balls, Processions, Out- 
Door Amusements, Etc. 
Laboratory, 9 WAY ST. BOSTON 
Down Town Office, 353 Washington St. 

MRS. L. E. PETTEE, 
Ladies' Hairdressim* Parlor 

Shampooing. Scientific Scalp Mas 
sage. Manicuring Chiropody, also 
Superfluous Hair Treated. 

Complexion Specialist. 

10 Franklin St., Natick, Mass. 



COL L E G E N E VV S 



ALUMNA NOTES. 



The Wellcslej Club ol S1 Loui has senl invitations to all 
graduates and former studenl ol Wcllesley who expeel to at- 
tend the meeting of the National Education Association to bi 
presenl a1 a breakfast to be given July sec. m l a1 elc en, A M., 
ii the Missouri Building, Those expecting i<> attend are .1 keel 
to send theii names to Miss Louise MtcNair, r8o6, 1 ■ 1 1 Mc Phei 
son avenue, St. Louis, bj June thirteenth 

On May 16. Professor Whiting lectured on " New Radiations" 
before Miss Porter's School. Farmington, Connecticut. Five 
Wellesley people are now in the Faculty of this school: Mile. 
Vauxtemps, formerly a member ol the French Department, 
Mil McDonald, [888, Miss Blauvelt, isso. Miss Marot. 1889- 
1 s,, 1 , Miss Louise Brow n, 1 893 

Miss Louise M, [-Iodgkins, formerly Professor of English Liter- 
ature, with Professor Whiting and her sister, has recently bought 
a summer home in Wilbraham. The house is charmingly 
situated, commanding a beautiful view, and they will be among 
pleasant neighbors and old friends connected with the Academy. 

H\ the death of Professor Stockbridge, father of Mrs. Anna 
Stockbridge Tuttle, 1880, formerly President of the Alumna? 
Association, t lie Amherst Agricultural College and the agricul- 
tural interests of New England have lost a man who for many 
years has labored for their advantage. He early recognized 
the fact that the agriculture of New England to achieve any 
measure of success must be conducted on scientific principles 
and so while others were content to raise good crops he made 
a study of seeds and soils and fertilizers which produced them. 
He was thus among the first to engage in agricultural experi- 
ments in a systematic and scientific manner and the results 
of his investigations were of vast importance to the agriculture 
of New England and the nation. To the general public he was 
perhaps best known as the inventor and patentee of the "Stock- 
bridge Fertilizers" which in a sense revolutionized agriculture 
in New England. The first Si, 000 received by him as royalties 
on these was presented to the Agricultural College to be used 
in conducting agricultural experiments. Aside from his in- 
vestigations in soil chemistry. Mr. Stockbridge made extensive 
researches in the line of plant life and growth, conducted experi- 
ments on percolation, evaporation and dew, employing instru- 
ments of his own invention, and formulated a new theory of 
the deposition of dew. He was active and influential in securing 
the location of the Massachusetts Agricultural College at Am- 
herst, and was for two years its President. He served also 
on the State Board of Agriculture and as a member of the Legis- 
lature was largely instrumental in securing the enactment of 
legislation in the interests of the farmers. 

Miss Mary Barrows. 1900, has severed her connection with the 
Home Science Publishing Company of Boston, and has formed a 
partnership with Mr. Frank H Whitcomb, formerly of the 
same company, as publishers and booksellers. They are sole 
publishers of "Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning." "Food 
Materials and Their Adulterations." "Home Sanitation'' and 
the "Rumford Leaflets." by Mrs. Ellen H. Richards, and of the 
"Home Science Cook Book," by Mrs. Mary T. "Lincoln and Miss 
Anna Barrows. After May ,^o their office will be in Huntington 
Chambers. Their present address is Box 146. Back Bay. 

MARRIAGES. 

Magenau-French. In Fremont, Nebraska, May 17, 1904. 
Miss Georgie B. French to Mr. William Magenau. 

DEATHS. 

At Lake City, Florida, May 2, 1004. Levi Stockbridge' 
father of Mrs. Anna Stockbridge Tuttle, 1SS0. 

In Cincinnati, Ohio, General Andrew Hickenlooper, father of 
Amelia S. Hickenlooper, 1893-1S94, and Mrs. Sarah Hicken- 
looper Withrow, 1SS9-1S91. 



ARTISTIC CREATIONS 

Gold, Silver, Glass and China, 

POR GIRTS AND PRIZES. 

Also Umbrellas and Opera Glasses. 

STRONGHOLD $I.OO XO $10.00. 




(mjulA&&^ 



24 Winter Street, Boston 



Have you seen the White Silks that 
Hatch is offering? ^ 

Yard-wide Silks, - $1.00 

White Pongee, - - $1.00 

Others at 52c, 65c, 72c per yard. 

Just the thing for your prettiest sum- 
mer gowns. 

Don't forget 

HATCH'S, 

54 ano 56 Summer St., Boeton. 




Pruits and Vegetables. 

Hot-House Products and Canned Goods. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN HOTEL, CLUB 
AND FAMILY ORDERS. 



ISAAC LOCKE <& CO., 

97, 9 9 and lOl Faneuil Hall MarKet, - Boston 

WILLIAM LEAVENS & CO,, "JSs! 2r 



CO 

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COLLEGE NEWS 




SOCIETY NOTES 



The Society Alpha Kappa Chi held its May program meeting 
on Wednesday evening, the twenty-fifth. A study of Roman 
Gardens was presented by Daisy G. Dutcher. Illustrative 
readings from Pliny the younger and Pliny the elder were given 
by Mabel Emerson. Ethel Jordan read selections which de- 
scribed the various forms of gardening in private families. 



NOTICE. 



In addition to the new courses offered for next year, course 
(). in Higher Analysis, will be given by A ssociate Professor Mer- 
rill of the Mathematics Department, and course rjT'a compara- 
tive study of Morphology, Embryology and Histology will be 
presented by Associate Professor Ferguson of the Botany De- 
partment. 

Student's Recital at Stone Hall. 



On Friday, May 27, and Tuesday, May 31, at 4.30, recitals 
were given in the Stone Hall Parlor by students in the Depart- 
ment of Music. The first recital consisted of twelve numbers, 
mostly of violin and pianoforte music. Misses Lallie Moody, 
Jessamine Phelps. Pauline Egelston, Margaret Dungan, Harriet 
Hyde, Katharine von Ach, Jessie Buchanan, and Ethel Jordan 
rendered the pianoforte numbers and Misses Marie Biddle and 
Sophie Brown, played the violin. Miss Isabelle Chandler, sang 
"An bord de la fontaine," and "A Song of Four Seasons." Miss 
Margaret Allen, Pianoforte, with the assistance of Miss Sara 
Corbett of Boston, Violinist, played Schumann's Fantasie- 
stuecke. The recital was very successful both as an expression 
of the students' work, and in the pleasure it gave to the audience. 

On Tuesday, the Song Recital was given. Misses Chandler, 
Perkins, Wells, Nevin, Snow, Wheeler, Bowen, Daniels and 
Gibbs sang with much beauty and power the various selections of 
the carefully arranged program. German, Italian, French, Irish, 
Scotch and English songs pleasantly varied the delightful 
entertainment of the afternoon. The Department of Music is 
to be both congratulated and thanked for making these two 
recitals possible at the close of the year's work. 



ESSAY PRIZE. 



The Woman's Trade Union League of Massachusetts offers 
a prize of §50.00 for an essay on the subject of "The Advantages 
of Trade Unionism for Women Workers." 

Competition for this prize is open to any woman studying in a 
New England College during the year 1903-4. 

Essays should contain between three and five thousand words 
and must be submitted before October 1st, 1904, to the Secretary 
of the Woman's Trade Union League, 314 Marlborough Street, 
Boston, Mass. The name and address of the writer should be 
attached in a sealed envelope. 

Special regard will be paid to interest of style, accuracy of 
statement and breadth of handling. 

The right is reserved to withdraw this offer if no essay is re- 
ceived which, in the opinion of the Committee, deserves the pro- 
posed recognition. 

The successful essay will become the property of the League 
and may be published at the discretion of the Committee. 



HERRICK'S, 

COl'LEY SQUARE, NEiR BACK RAY POST-OFFICE, 

BEST TICKETS FOR ALL THE THEATRES. 

Phone now 232a, 2330 mid 2331 



Chickerino- Pianos 

^^ CT 

The OLDEST in AMERICA .- 
THE BEST in the WORLD 



Chickeriitg &f Sons 



iOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




Underwood's Deviled Ham 

will be found invaluable. Wholesome, de- 
licious, and appetizing, whether eaten cold 
just as it comes from the can, or as an addi- 
tion to eggs, fish, and birds when cooked. 
Made of ham and pure spices, that's all. Look 
on the can for the little red devil. That's 
the real UNDERWOOD'S. All dealers. 



E. T. SLATTERY CO 

NeW WalRing vSultS of Fine Imported Mixtures 

NeW Veiling DreSSeS from the latest Paris Models 

NEW FRENCH MILLINERY AND N E C K W E A R . 

We recommend the Fairfax Linen Waist to Wellesley College Girls. 
154 and 155 Tremont Street, Boston 



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